Hellenic Quotes

I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world. Socrates, from Plutarch, Of Banishment

Thou shouldst eat to live; not live to eat. Socrates

Having the fewest wants, I am nearest to the gods. Socrates, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance. Socrates, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance. Socrates, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live. Socrates, from Plutarch, How a Young Man Ought to Hear Poems

By all means marry; if you get a good wife, you’ll be happy. If you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher. Socrates

Get not your friends by bare compliments, but by giving them sensible tokens of your love. Socrates

Regard your good name as the richest jewel you can possibly be possessed of – for credit is like fire; when once you have kindled it you may easily preserve it, but if you once extinguish it, you will find it an arduous task to rekindle it again. The way to gain a good reputation is to endeavor to be what you desire to appear. Socrates

Remember that there is nothing stable in human affairs; therefore avoid undue elation in prosperity, or undue depression in adversity. Socrates

The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance. Socrates

Think not those faithful who praise all thy words and actions; but those who kindly reprove thy faults. Socrates

I do nothing but go about persuading you all, old and young alike, not to take thought for your persons or your properties, but and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man, public as well as private. This is my teaching, and if this is the doctrine which corrupts the youth, I am a mischievous person. Socrates, quoted by Plato, ‘The Death of Socrates’
If women are expected to do the same work as men, we must teach them the same things. Plato

Never discourage anyone…who continually makes progress, no matter how slow. Plato

They certainly give very strange names to diseases. Plato

Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something. Plato

You are so young, my son, and, as the years go by, time will change and even reverse many of your present opinions. Refrain therefore awhile from setting yourself up as judge of the highest matters. Plato

You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. Plato

No evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death. Plato, Dialogues, Apology

The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our ways – I to die, and you to live. Which is better God only knows. Plato, Dialogues, Apology

The life which is unexamined is not worth living. Plato, Dialogues, Apology

You cannot conceive the many without the one. Plato, Dialogues, Parmenides
False words are not only evil in themselves, but they infect the soul with evil. Plato, Dialogues, Phaedo

Must not all things at the last be swallowed up in death? Plato, Dialogues, Phaedo

The partisan, when he is engaged in a dispute, cares nothing about the rights of the question, but is anxious only to convince his hearers of his own assertions. Plato, Dialogues, Phaedo

Friends have all things in common. Plato, Dialogues, Phaedrus

The greatest penalty of evildoing – namely, to grow into the likeness of bad men. Plato, Dialogues, Theatetus

You are young, my son, and, as the years go by, time will change and even reverse many of your present opinions. Refrain therefore awhile from setting yourself up as a judge of the highest matters. Plato, Dialogues, Theatetus

Astronomy compels the soul to look upwards and leads us from this world to another. Plato, The Republic

Bodily exercise, when compulsory, does no harm to the body; but knowledge which is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind. Plato, The Republic

Everything that deceives may be said to enchant. Plato, The Republic

He who is of calm and happy nature will hardly feel the pressure of age, but to him who is of an opposite disposition youth and age are equally a burden. Plato, The Republic
I have hardly ever known a mathematician who was capable of reasoning. Plato, The Republic

Mankind censure injustice fearing that they may be the victims of it, and not because they shrink from committing it. Plato, The Republic

The beginning is the most important part of the work. Plato, The Republic

The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future life. Plato, The Republic

The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness…This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector. Plato, The Republic

The soul of man is immortal and imperishable. Plato, The Republic

There are three arts which are concerned with all things: one which uses, another which makes, and a third which imitates them. Plato, The Republic

Wealth is the parent of luxury and indolence, and poverty of meanness and viciousness, and both of discontent. Plato, The Republic

When there is an income tax, the just man will pay more and the unjust less on the same amount of income. Plato, The Republic
All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind. Aristotle

Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in the consciousness that we deserve them. Aristotle

For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them. Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

Men acquire a particular quality by constantly acting a particular way…you become just by performing just actions, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave actions. Aristotle

The gods too are fond of a joke. Aristotle

We are what we repeatedly do. Aristotle

Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods. Aristotle

Young people are in a condition like permanent intoxication, because youth is sweet and they are growing. Aristotle, ‘Nicomachean Ethics’

It is not always the same thing to be a good man and a good citizen. Aristotle, ‘Nicomachean Ethics,’ 325 B.C.
Misfortune shows those who are not really friends. Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics

Education is the best provision for old age. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
Hope is a waking dream. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

I have gained this by philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

Liars when they speak the truth are not believed. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
All men by nature desire knowledge. Aristotle, Metaphysics

For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them. Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

Misfortune shows those who are not really friends. Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics

Education is the best provision for old age. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
Hope is a waking dream. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
I have gained this by philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

Liars when they speak the truth are not believed. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies. Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
All men by nature desire knowledge. Aristotle, Metaphysics

For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them. Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

It is possible to fail in many ways…while to succeed is possible only in one way. Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

One swallow does not make a summer. Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics
Well begun is half done. Aristotle, Politics

A likely impossibility is always preferable to an unconvincing possibility. Aristotle, Rhetoric

A whole is that which has beginning, middle and end. Aristotle, Rhetoric

Evil draws men together. Aristotle, Rhetoric

It is simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences. Aristotle, Rhetoric
Give me where to stand, and I will move the earth. Archimedes, 300 B.C.
Above all things, reverence yourself. Pythagoras

It is better wither to be silent, or to say things of more value than silence. Sooner throw a pearl at hazard than an idle or useless word; and do not say a little in many words, but a great deal in a few. Pythagoras

Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to talk of you as they please. Pythagoras

Reason is immortal, all else mortal. Pythagoras, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
Most men are within a finger’s breadth of being mad. Diogenes the Cynic

[When asked what was the proper time for supper] If you are a rich man, whenever you please; and if you are a poor man, whenever you can. Diogenes the Cynic, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers
One ought to seek out virtue for its own sake, without being influenced by fear or hope, or by any external influence. Moreover, that in that does happiness consist. Diogenes Laertius, Zeno

As a matter of self-preservation, a man needs good friends or ardent enemies, for the former instruct him and the latter take him to task. Diogenes
If only it was as easy to banish hunger by rubbing the belly as it is to masturbate. Diogenes the Cynic (412 to 323 B.C.)
When two friends part they should lock up each other’s secrets and exchange keys. The truly noble mind has no resentments. Diogenes
Do thou restrain the haughty spirit in thy breast, for better far is gentle courtesy. Homer

It is equally offensive to speed a guest who would like to stay and to detain one who is anxious to leave. Homer

A companion’s words of persuasion are effective. Homer, The Iliad

A councilor ought not to sleep the whole night through, a man to whom the populace is entrusted, and who has many responsibilities. Homer, The Iliad

A generation of men is like a generation of leaves; the wind scatters some leaves upon the ground, while others the burgeoning wood brings forth – and the season of spring comes on. So of men one generation springs forth and another ceases. Homer, The Iliad

A multitude of rulers is not a good thing. Let there be one ruler, one king. Homer, The Iliad

Even when someone battles hard, there is an equal portion for one who lingers behind, and in the same honor are held both the coward and the brave man; the idle man and he who has done much meet death alike. Homer, The Iliad

Hateful to me as the gates of Hades is that man who hides one thing in his heart and speaks another. Homer, The Iliad

He knew the things that were and the things that would be and the things that had been before. Homer, The Iliad

He lives not long who battles with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he has come back from battle and the dread fray. Homer, The Iliad
I too shall lie in the dust when I am dead, but now let me win noble renown. Homer, The Iliad

If you are very valiant, it is a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Homer, The Iliad

It is entirely seemly for a young man killed in battle to lie mangled by the bronze spear. In his death all things appear fair. But when dogs shame the gray head and gray chin and nakedness of an old man killed, it is the most piteous thing that happens among wretched mortals. Homer, The Iliad

It is not possible to fight beyond your strength, even if you strive. Homer, The Iliad

It is not unseemly for a man to die fighting in defense of his country. Homer, The Iliad

It was built against the will of the immortal gods, and so it did not last for long. Homer, The Iliad

Miserable mortals who, like leaves, at one moment flame with life, eating the produce of the land, and at another moment weakly perish. Homer, The Iliad

Of men who have a sense of honor, more come through alive than are slain, but from those who flee comes neither glory nor any help. Homer, The Iliad

Once harm has been done, even a fool understands it. Homer, The Iliad

The fates have given mankind a patient soul. Homer, The Iliad
The glorious gifts of the gods are not to be cast aside. Homer, The Iliad

The outcome of the war is in our hands; the outcome of words is in the council. Homer, The Iliad

The single best augury is to fight for one’s country. Homer, The Iliad

There is a fullness of all things, even of sleep and love. Homer, The Iliad

There is a strength in the union even of very sorry men. Homer, The Iliad

Thus have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals: that they live in grief while they themselves are without cares; for two jars stand on the floor of Zeus of the gifts which he gives, one of evils and another of blessings. Homer, The Iliad

Whoever obeys the gods, to him they are particularly listen. Homer, The Iliad

You will certainly not be able to take the lead in all things yourself, for to one man a god has given deeds of war, and to another the dance, to another lyre and song, and in another wide-sounding Zeus puts a good mind. Homer, The Iliad

Young men’s minds are always changeable, but when an old man is concerned in a matter, he looks both before and after. Homer, The Iliad

Zeus does not bring all men’s plans to fulfillment. Homer, The Iliad
A small rock holds back a great wave. Homer, The Odyssey

A young man is embarrassed to question an older one. Homer, The Odyssey

All men have need of the gods. Homer, The Odyssey

All strangers and beggars are from Zeus, and a gift, though small, is precious. Homer, The Odyssey

Among all men on the earth bards have a share of honor and reverence, because the muse has taught them songs and loves the race of bards. Homer, The Odyssey

By their own follies they perished, the fools. Homer, The Odyssey

Dreams surely are difficult, confusing, and not everything in them is brought to pass for mankind. For fleeting dreams have two gates: one is fashioned of horn and one of ivory. Those which pass through the one of sawn ivory are deceptive, bringing tidings which come to nought, but those which issue from the one of polished horn bring true results when a mortal sees them. Homer, The Odyssey

Even his griefs are a joy long after to one that remembers all that he wrought and endured. Homer, The Odyssey

Evil deeds do not prosper; the slow man catches up with the swift. Homer, The Odyssey

For rarely are sons similar to their fathers: most are worse, and a few are better than their fathers. Homer, The Odyssey
I should rather labor as another’s serf, in the home of a man without fortune, one whose livelihood was meager, than rule over all the departed dead. Homer, The Odyssey

It is equally wrong to speed a guest who does not want to go, and to keep one back who is eager. You ought to make welcome the present guest, and send forth the one who wishes to go. Homer, The Odyssey

It is tedious to tell again tales already plainly told. Homer, The Odyssey

Look now how mortals are blaming the gods, for they say that evils come from us, but in fact they themselves have woes beyond their share because of their own follies. Homer, The Odyssey

May the gods grant you all things which your heart desires, and may they give you a husband and a home and gracious concord, for there is nothing greater and better than this -when a husband and wife keep a household in oneness of mind, a great woe to their enemies and joy to their friends, and win high renown. Homer, The Odyssey

Nothing feebler than a man does the earth raise up, of all the things which breathe and move on the earth, for he believes that he will never suffer evil in the future, as long as the gods give him success and he flourishes in his strength; but when the blessed gods bring sorrows too to pass, even these he bears, against his will, with steadfast spirit, for the thoughts of earthly men are like the day which the father of gods and men brings upon them. Homer, The Odyssey

So it is that the gods do not five all men gifts of grace – neither good looks nor intelligence nor eloquence. Homer, The Odyssey

The gods, likening themselves to all kinds of strangers, go in various disguises from city to city, observing the wrongdoing and the righteousness of men. Homer, The Odyssey

The minds of the everlasting gods are not changed suddenly. Homer, The Odyssey

The wine urges me on, the bewitching wine, which sets even a wise man to singing and to laughing gently and rouses him up to dance and brings forth words which were better unspoken. Homer, The Odyssey
There is a time for many words, and there is also a time for sleep. Homer, The Odyssey

There is nothing more dread and more shameless than a woman who plans such deeds in her heart as the foul deed which she plotted when she contrived her husband’s murder. Homer, The Odyssey

We are quick to flare up, we races of men on the earth. Homer, The Odyssey

Wide-sounding Zeus takes away half a man’s worth on the day when slavery comes upon him. Homer, The Odyssey

You ought not to practice childish ways, since you are no longer that age. Homer, The Odyssey
Wait for that wisest of all counselors, Time. Pericles (495 BC – 429 BC), from Plutarch, Lives

Trees, though they are cut and lopped, grow up again quickly, but if men are destroyed, it is not easy to get them again. Pericles (495 BC – 429 BC), from Plutarch, Lives

Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds. Herodotus, Inscription, New York City Post Office, adapted from Herodotus

Force has no place where there is need of skill. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

Great deeds are usually wrought at great risks. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

Haste in every business brings failures. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

If a man insisted always on being serious, and never allowed himself a bit of fun and relaxation, he would go mad or become unstable without knowing it. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

In peace, children inter their parents; war violates the order of nature and causes parents to inter their children. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

In soft regions are born soft men. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

It is better to be envied than pitied. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

Men trust their ears less than their eyes. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

Not snow, no, nor rain, nor heat, nor night keeps them from accomplishing their appointed courses with all speed. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus
The king’s might is greater than human, and his arm is very long. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus

This is the bitterest pain among men, to have much knowledge but no power. Herodotus, The Histories of Herodotus
One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love. Sophocles

What you cannot enforce, do not command. Sophocles

No man loves life like him that’s growing old. Sophocles, Acrisius

To him who is in fear everything rustles. Sophocles, Acrisius

It is not righteousness to outrage a brave man dead, not even though you hate him. Sophocles, Ajax

Men of ill judgment oft ignore the good that lies within their hands, till they have lost it. Sophocles, Ajax

Of all human ills, greatest is fortune’s wayward tyranny. Sophocles, Ajax

For God hates utterly the bray of bragging tongues. Sophocles, Antigone

Grief teaches the steadiest minds to waver. Sophocles, Antigone

How dreadful it is when the right judge judges wrong! Sophocles, Antigone
I have nothing but contempt for the kind of governor who is afraid, for whatever reason, to follow the course that he knows is best for the State; and as for the man who sets private friendship above the public welfare – I have no use for him either. Sophocles, Antigone

Money: There’s nothing in the world so demoralizing as money. Sophocles, Antigone

Nobody likes the man who brings bad news. Sophocles, Antigone

Numberless are the world’s wonders, but none more wonderful than man. Sophocles, Antigone

Reason is God’s crowning gift to man. Sophocles, Antigone

Show me the man who keeps his house in hand, he’s fit for public authority. Sophocles, Antigone

The ideal condition would be, I admit, that men should be right by instinct;
but since we are all likely to go astray,
the reasonable thing is to learn from those who can teach. Sophocles, Antigone

There is no happiness where there is no wisdom;
No wisdom but in submission to the gods.
Big words are always punished,
And proud men in old age learn to be wise. Sophocles, Antigone

Wisdom outweighs any wealth. Sophocles, Antigone

Truly, to tell lies is not honorable;
but when the truth entails tremendous ruin,
to speak dishonorably is pardonable. Sophocles, Creusa Death is not the worst; rather, in vain

to wish for death, and not to compass it. Sophocles, Electra

It made our hair stand up in panic fear. Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus

One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life:
That word is love. Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus

Stranger in a strange country. Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus

The good befriend themselves. Sophocles, Oedipus at Colonus

How dreadful knowledge of the truth can be
When there’s no help in truth! Sophocles, Oedipus Rex

The greatest griefs are those we case ourselves. Sophocles, Oedipus Rex

Time eases all things. Sophocles, Oedipus Rex

A prudent mind can see room for misgiving, lest he who prospers would one day suffer reverse. Sophocles, Trachiniae

Knowledge must come through action; you can have no test which is not fanciful, save by trial. Sophocles, Trachiniae Rash indeed is he who reckons on the morrow, or haply on days beyond it; for tomorrow is not, until today is past. Sophocles, Trachiniae For somehow this is tyranny’s disease, to trust no friends. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Prometheus Bound

Words are the physicians of the mind diseased. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Prometheus Bound

Time as he grows old teaches all things. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Prometheus Bound

It is in the character of very few men to honor without envy a friend who has prospered. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Agamemnon

Only when man’s life comes to its end it prosperity can one call that man happy. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Agamemnon

Death is better, a milder fate than tyranny. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Agamemnon

I know how men in exile feed on dreams of hope Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), Agamemnon

Destiny waits alike for the free man as well as for him enslaved by another’s might. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), The Libation Bearers

His resolve is not to seem, but to be, the best. Aeschylus (525 BC – 456 BC), The Seven Against Thebes

Do not consider painful what is good for you. Euripides

Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish. Euripides

The best and safest thing is to keep a balance in your life, acknowledge the great powers around us and in us. If you can do that, and live that way, you are really a wise man. Euripides

Waste not fresh tears over old griefs. Euripides

Slight not what’s near, while aiming at what’s far. Euripides, ‘Rhesus’

I have found power in the mysteries of thought. Euripides, 438 B.C.

A bad beginning makes a bad ending. Euripides, Aegeus

The company of just and righteous men is better than wealth and a rich estate. Euripides, Aegeus

Time will explain it all. He is a talker, and needs no questioning before he speaks. Euripides, Aeolus

A second wife
is hateful to the children of the first;
a viper is not more hateful. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C. A sweet thing, for whatever time,
to revisit in dreams the dear dad we have lost. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C.

Dishonor will not trouble me, once I am dead. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C.

I have found power in the mysteries of thought,
exaltation in the changing of the Muses;
I have been versed in the reasonings of men;
but Fate is stronger than anything I have known. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C.

Light be the earth upon you, lightly rest. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C.

Never say that marriage has more of joy than pain. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C.

Time cancels young pain. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C. You were a stranger to sorrow: therefore Fate has cursed you. Euripides, Alcestis, 438 B.C.

Waste not fresh tears over old griefs. Euripides, Alexander

Man’s best possession is a sympathetic wife. Euripides, Antigone

I care for riches, to make gifts
To friends, or lead a sick man back to health
With ease and plenty. Else small aid is wealth
For daily gladness; once a man be done
With hunger, rich and poor are all as one. Euripides, Electra, 413 B.C. Those whom God wishes to destroy, he first makes mad. Euripides, Fragment

In case of dissension, never dare to judge till you’ve heard the other side. Euripides, Heraclidae, circa 428 B.C.

Leave no stone unturned. Euripides, Heraclidae, circa 428 B.C. In this world second thoughts, it seems, are best. Euripides, Hippolytus, 428 B.C.

My tongue swore, but my mind was still unpledged. Euripides, Hippolytus, 428 B.C.

There is one thing alone
that stands the brunt of life throughout its course:
a quiet conscience. Euripides, Hippolytus, 428 B.C.

A coward turns away, but a brave man’s choice is danger. Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris, circa 412 B.C.

The day is for honest men, the night for thieves. Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris, circa 412 B.C.

I know indeed what evil I intend to do,
but stronger than all my afterthoughts is my fury,
fury that brings upon mortals the greatest evils. Euripides, Medea, 431 B.C.

There is no benefit in the gifts of a bad man. Euripides, Medea, 431 B.C. What greater grief than the loss of one’s native land. Euripides, Medea, 431 B.C.

When love is in excess it brings a man nor honor nor any worthiness. Euripides, Medea, 431 B.C.

Every man is like the company he is wont to keep. Euripides, Phoenix

The gods visit the sins of the fathers upon the children. Euripides, Phrixus

Whoso neglects learning in his youth,
loses the past and is dead for the future. Euripides, Phrixus

Slight not what’s near through aiming at what’s far. Euripides, Rhesus, circa 435 B.C.

When good men die their goodness does not perish,
but lives though they are gone. As for the bad,
all that was theirs dies and is buried with them. Euripides, Temenidae

Slow but sure moves the might of the gods. Euripides, The Bacchae, circa 407 B.C.

Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish. Euripides, The Bacchae, circa 407 B.C. High thoughts must have high language. Aristophanes, Frogs, 405 B.C.

Shall I crack any of those old jokes, master,
at which the audience never fail to laugh? Aristophanes, Frogs, 405 B.C.

You have all the characteristics of a popular politician: a horrible voice, bad breeding, and a vulgar manner. Aristophanes, Knights, 424 B.C.

A man’s homeland is wherever he prospers. Aristophanes, Plutus, 388 B.C.

Under every stone lurks a politician. Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae, 410 B.C.

Let each man exercise the art he knows. Aristophanes, Wasps, 422 B.C.

This is what extremely grieves us, that a man who never fought
should contrive our fees to pilfer, on who for his native land
never to this day had oar, or lance, or blister in his hand. Aristophanes, Wasps, 422 B.C.

Seek not, my soul, the life of the immortals; but enjoy to the full the resources that are within thy reach. Pindar, 518-438 B.C.

Words have a longer life than deeds. Pindar, Nemean Odes I choose the likely man in preference to the rich man; I want a man without money rather than money without a man. Themistocles (528 BC – 462 BC), from Plutarch, Lives

I have with me two gods, Persuasion and Compulsion. Themistocles (528 BC – 462 BC), from Plutarch, Lives